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> Learning Curve On .adp, Access 2010    
 
   
bakersburg9
post May 11 2017, 04:15 PM
Post#1



Posts: 4,925
Joined: 2-November 04
From: Downey, CA


If you know basic DOS commands, you can write it in notepad, save it to your desktop with a .bat extension, click on it and it will run/execute - BAM! You just learned about batch files... do the same, but save it with a .VBS extension, and BAM! ... you know VBScript !

... that being said, I hope the learning curve for .adp files FILES? is similar

can I get a quick course in ADP 101? Cliff's notes version ?

Steve
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GroverParkGeorge
post May 11 2017, 05:20 PM
Post#2


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Posts: 30,972
Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


I would not waste time on ADPs, even though they were not yet deprecated in 2010.

Let me rephrase. If you are not already working with ADPs, and do not have an investment in them, there's little point learning about them. If you are required to work with them for a new job, or support them in a current job, of course, you need to understand them.
This post has been edited by GroverParkGeorge: May 11 2017, 05:24 PM

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bakersburg9
post May 11 2017, 06:44 PM
Post#3



Posts: 4,925
Joined: 2-November 04
From: Downey, CA


Ok, so Access Data Projects were introduced in v2010, and were discontinued with the 2013 release – I found the following:

Access 2013 SQL-based databases will replace much of the benefit of ADPs.

There are three possible mitigations for ADPs:
• Convert the ADP to an Access App solution.
• Convert the ADP to a linked Access Desktop Database.
• Convert the ADP to a full SQL-based solution.
• Import objects into an ACCDE (compiled) file and then create linked tables to the existing data by using an earlier version of Access

Microsoft Access provides a special format for working directly with SQL Server databases. This format is called an ADP - or Access Data Project. This format allows you to connect directly to a Microsoft SQL Server Database, but still have the powerful Access Form and Report capability in building a front end application.

If it’s so powerful, why did they discontinue it ? I still don’t understand exactly what it is …

Steve
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cheekybuddha
post May 11 2017, 08:08 PM
Post#4


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Joined: 6-December 03
From: Telegraph Hill


>> Ok, so Access Data Projects were introduced in v2010 <<

Hmm...

I think they were introduced in Acc 2000

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Regards,

David Marten
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GroverParkGeorge
post May 11 2017, 10:12 PM
Post#5


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Posts: 30,972
Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


Sorry, I should have provided more background. In the 2010 version, the ability to create new ADPs was ended, but previously existing ADPs could still be used in that version. The ability to even use them was removed from the 2013 version.


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AlbertKallal
post May 11 2017, 10:51 PM
Post#6


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Posts: 2,540
Joined: 12-April 07
From: Edmonton, Alberta Canada


What is a Access Data Project (ADP).

In a simple nut shell, it means you MUST and are ALWAYS using SQL server as the back end - even when you write SQL etc. But you can 100% develop everything in Access and you don't have to know, bother or use any SQL server tools. So you creating "native" SQL server applications. You don't even "link" tables - but one could argue that the resulting application is much like a standard Access application with linked tables.

As noted ADP’s were around for about 10 years starting in Access 2000.

I do think the statements are somewhat confusing.

• Convert the ADP to an Access App solution.

In above I think they mean dump the ADP project and build a new access web 2013 application. So the word “convert” is in the context of a manual conversion.

• Convert the ADP to a linked Access Desktop Database.

The above is the most practical and common solution. The most recommend solution especially for existing applications that previous used Access tables/database.

• Convert the ADP to a full SQL-based solution.

Well, an ADP project ALREADY has the tables in SQL server. So it not clear what GUI or front end they are suggesting, but no actual conversion or migration of the data to SQL server is required since that is where the data was and is already. So a full SQL solution means you building the front end GUI as web based, or perhaps in vb.net or whatever.


• Import objects into an ACCDE

The above again it confusing and as written is likely wrong. You HAVE to use a standard accDB – not an accDE for this process - that is a clear type-o.

As for why they dropped then after being around for about 12 years? Well, for one FEW people used ADP’s. Another really bad aspect of ADP’s is they were VERY sensitive to the version of SQL server that you paired with the ADP project.

As general rule just using Access + linked tables to SQL server is a better choice. The one BIG selling point of ADP’s was that you really did not have to know anything about SQL server, and everything you built + write in Access resulted in a VERY high performance “native” SQL application (all SQL and queries were executed 100% server side). So you obtained an optimized SQL solution without much knowledge or effort by the Access developer.

When you use linked tables to SQL server then somewhat more effort is required to achieve high performance on par with an ADP, but with a “bit” of experience, the efforts required are rather easy. And with linked tables you achieve a far more flexible application. (because you can have local tables, and also links to other types of files at the same time like dBase, csv etc. - you can't do that with ADP's).

ADP’s are being dropped for 3 main reasons.

1
The access developer community tended to prefer and use linked tables to SQL server.

2
Since office/Access tracks you usage habits and what features you use (they are transmitted to Redmond when Access crashes and you choose to “send” that report). So the folks in Redmond found VERY few users of ADP’s (but those who did use ADP’s were VERY passionate about this option we had). So few access users were choosing this option.

3
SQL server is dropping support for oleDB connections – and ADP’s were based on this technology stack. So SQL server killing this option REALLY spelled the death for Access ADP’s that where based on this technology stack.

So a run of slightly over 10 years is a longer time span then VB5 and VB6 combined. So ADP’s did exist for a considerable ride in terms of a software choice lasting – but time marches on.

Regards,
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
kallal@msn.com


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