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ConorS
post Mar 30 2011, 08:27 AM
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From: Northern Ireland (Newry)


Hi
sing photshop CS 8. I am about to get my album booklet printed up (cd).
Owent to the printer with my .psd files. The guy that works there told me, the text in the booklet shouldn't be rasterised. It should be vectorised. Its preferable. I am to make sure they are this way. I understand that vectorising will make the text sharper in the print.
How do i do this in photoshop? (i'm not very experienced at photoshop)
Is there a way of saving the file like this? How do you do it?
Thanks
Conor
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ConorS
post Mar 30 2011, 08:39 AM
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From: Northern Ireland (Newry)


I might have it. When i export it (save as) as a pdf. i choose, "include vector data" , i also choose embedded fonts. (incase the printer doesn't have the fonts on his machine).
This seems to make the text sharp when i zoom in on the pdf.
When export the file i don't select "include vector data", and i zoom it. Its pixelly.
This might well be the problem sorted.
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doctor9
post Mar 30 2011, 08:44 AM
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Conor,
You could probably take your .PSD file to the printer, rather than export to .PDF beforehand.
If they are capable of determining the difference between rasterized and pixellated text, they probably have a copy of Photoshop.
BTW, if your PSD file's dimensions match the size of your printout, it shouldn't matter. For example, if you're printing an 8.5x11 inch image, your image size should be 8.5x11 at 300 pixels per inch or better.
Dennis
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ConorS
post Mar 30 2011, 09:16 AM
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From: Northern Ireland (Newry)


ok thanks for the help. Will do.
ennis. Thank you.
If you get a minute check out the album here: http://www.last.fm/music/Midtown+Reign/Seat+By+The+Window
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CyberCow
post Mar 30 2011, 11:10 AM
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From: Upper MI


Conor, were I to take an image to the printer for a print job, I would generate a PFD (rasterized) as well as a PSD. On the PSD, I would make a copy of (duplicate) the fonted layer(s) and rasterize it/them. That way, if the printshop has Photoshop, but not the fonts you've used, more options are available.
You can rasterize a font layer by right-clicking on the font layer and select "Rasterize"
hope this helps
BTW: When did Adobe come out with Photoshop CS8 - I thought they only just released CS5? iconfused.gif
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ConorS
post Mar 30 2011, 11:30 AM
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forgive my ignorance. what exactly is rasterizing?
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BananaRepublic
post Mar 30 2011, 11:35 AM
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From: Banana Republic


Raster graphics is basically a bitmap; you have a (typically) a square of predefined numbers of pixels and you color each pixels accordingly to give a representation of image. As you may already know, if you resize a bitmap, you see some quality loss.
ector graphics OTOH do not depend on pixel counts - they are expressed via a set of mathematical functions to describe their shape. That way you can resize image without any loss to the quality.
But here's the kicker. How do you put vector graphics on a screen or printer? Hint: you can't! Both need to be able to assign some kind of color to a specific location, so they can't work with vector, at least not directly and thus need to rasterize a vector graphic. Of course, if the device can handle the vector graphic, what they'll do is convert it to whatever size they need to render it in raster and you'd never see any loss of quality whether you put it on a small piece of paper or giant-size poster.
Hope that helps.
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ConorS
post Mar 30 2011, 12:35 PM
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From: Northern Ireland (Newry)


yes i think i get it.
asterizing commits it to the image.
In music, a vector is kind of like a midi track. A rasterized tracks is an actual audio track.
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doctor9
post Mar 30 2011, 02:44 PM
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Think of a vector as a DEFINITON of a curve, like in math class where you have to plot a wave. You can scale that curve up so big that it's on a billboard, but it will still have a sharp, smooth edge. But once you rasterize it, it's a set of shaded pixels, that will only become bigger squares as you scale it up. (It's why us nerds scoff whenever someone on TV says "enhance that section of the image" and the zoomed-in section doesn't appear degraded at all.)
IDI information is not so much about the definition of a sound wave, but more about properties of a sound EVENT, like when it starts, ends, and how long it lasts. You can run the same MIDI file on different synthesizers and get entirely different sounds.
Dennis
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BananaRepublic
post Mar 30 2011, 02:47 PM
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Thanks, Dennis. I know absolutely nothing about musics and thus had no idea how to respond to the analogy of MIDI & audio tracks.
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CyberCow
post Mar 30 2011, 04:13 PM
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"the analogy of MIDI & audio tracks." used by ConorS is spot on. While (as Dennis pointed out) a MIDI defines the event (curves, lines, shape & size), the tone (sound - sax, piano, whatever) is completely arbitrary.
The characters used in a document are shaped the way they are by definition of a font. So while the words of the textural content do not change, changing the font mearly alters the appearance of the lettering. MIDI is much like the characters (alpha-numeric and special characters) typed (played) by the writer (musician). The musician can pick whatever sound he wants the listener to hear - a saxophone or piano, or whatever. But once the musician records that selected sound (sax, piano, etc) onto a recording track (document) it is no longer subject to change - if "sax" is selected, it (that track) will always be a sax track.
And when a Photoshop text layer is rasterized, further font selection is no longer a choice, it will always be the font the user chose once "rasterized".
Pretty cool anology on ConorS' part. Oh, and "Rasterize" pretty much is the same as "Vectorize" - rendering the thing less-flexible than it once was and not requiring any specific font file.
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ConorS
post Mar 30 2011, 04:49 PM
Post#12



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From: Northern Ireland (Newry)


Thanks guys for helping me to see the difference. Comparing it to midi, i was just trying to picture it in my mind and understand it.
Good work.
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