UtterAccess.com
X   Site Message
(Message will auto close in 2 seconds)

Welcome to UtterAccess! Please ( Login   or   Register )

Custom Search
 
   Reply to this topicStart new topic
> What Sould Size Of Form... At Most Basic...?, Office 2007    
 
   
khalakmu
post Jul 5 2011, 02:58 AM
Post#1



Posts: 251
Joined: 31-July 10



Hi,
Please forgive me .. I did not know which Thread I should ask the question...
this is related to form Size... (Displaying on Monitor)..
I am creating Database in Access 2007.. Forms on My monitor Stretches to 23"size..
Though these new Display Monitors are of different sizes.. so what size at most to use
For basic Form not cluttering fields.. if somebody uses smaller monitor to use Database
when I create form of 8.5" wide.. my form Stretches to 23' leaving other space blank..

thanks in Advance..
Khalak
Go to the top of the page
 
yvesdekort
post Jul 5 2011, 03:17 AM
Post#2


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 1,948
Joined: 9-August 01
From: Belgium


Hi,
creen resolution is probably the more determining factor.
If I use a 23" monitor with a 800x600 resolution, you might even have trouble viewing a 8,5" form at once.
I think you should look at what resolutions the majority of users will work and develop your forms for this size.
People working at higher resolutions might see a lot of blank spaces (depending on how you decide to display the forms, full screen, overlapping winodws, ...)
People working at lower resolutions will need to scroll a lot. If you (or they) don't want that, you need to develop with the lowest resolution in mind.
Go to the top of the page
 
jleach
post Jul 5 2011, 06:00 AM
Post#3


UtterAccess Editor
Posts: 9,991
Joined: 7-December 09
From: St Augustine, FL


I generally go with, at very most, no larger than the lowest screen resolution it is to fit in. IMO there's nothing worse than an interface where you're forced to use scrollbars on a form to see the whole thing.
For most heavy use forms though I prefer to go even a little smaller... this allows the user, at the lowest res, to have multiple forms open at once and still easily click from one to the other, which is difficult if they're taking up 90% of the screen real estate. For most "heavy use" form's I go with 8.5 x 5, assuming that nobody's going to be using 800 x 600 resolution anymore. Popup forms are generally much smaller, enough to hold the info but large enough not to be cramped.
Oalso tend to not maximize forms, simply because it's difficult to maintain a decent looking layout across resolutions. For the "home" form, I use a somwhat larger form size with no border, and change the MDI background to match the form's background color (both white in my case) (see Leban's site for ChangeMDI) so it appears that the app's home form is always the size of the actual access window, but you still won't get scrolling etc.
hth
Go to the top of the page
 
yvesdekort
post Jul 5 2011, 06:12 AM
Post#4


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 1,948
Joined: 9-August 01
From: Belgium


Jack,
agree that scrolling is not good.
Odon't completely agree you should always design for lowest resolution: if you have say 20 users at 1280x1024 and 1 at 800x600, it could be more effective to design for 1280x1024 and give the user at 800x600 another monitor (or persuade him to change resolution) which can also display 1280x1024. This way you can show more info on one form (or show same info in a clearer way) which can improve productivity a lot.
Go to the top of the page
 
jleach
post Jul 5 2011, 06:16 AM
Post#5


UtterAccess Editor
Posts: 9,991
Joined: 7-December 09
From: St Augustine, FL


Agreed, Yves, I probably should have worded that a bit different. Until recently, I had one user in a setting of 6 or 7 users that still was on 800 x 600, but I still maintained the standard form size to 8.5 x 5. I'm of the mind that in a typical small office setting anymore if someone is still using 800 x 600 they'll need to deal with it! (chances are they're used to it, even most websites nowadays don't show well at that res).
Cheers,
Go to the top of the page
 
AlbertKallal
post Jul 5 2011, 07:07 AM
Post#6


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 2,813
Joined: 12-April 07
From: Edmonton, Alberta Canada


This is a great question. Part of the answer lies in how UA re-sizes this page you are are viewing now. If I re-size my browser smaller, I see this :

Take a look at how the above subject text wraps
Look at how the combo box and buttons on the right.
Now, if I make the browser larger, I see this:

Note how the above RIGHT hand combo, GO button, and Options button moved to the right. Note how the subject text box increased and does not wrap.
I am going to to a quick cut + paste of these objects into a Access form. Ok. Now watch this!
The smaller Access for looks like;


Larger Access form (I just re-sized Access) now looks like;

Note how all of the boxes moved the SAME WAY as UA!
This in web land is called control anchoring. You see this in Outlook, and a good many web sites, but also in desktop programs.
Control anchoring means that your controls and screen will move and re-size as the form size changes. This technique takes time to learn, but now that Access supports this feature, it will just take the Access community some time to learn this feature.
You can see the options in the ribbon like this:

The rule of building and layout of your form to the smallest resolution still applies, but now you can as least have your controls spill over just like this web page you are reading does.
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
kallal@msn.com
Go to the top of the page
 
jleach
post Jul 5 2011, 07:15 AM
Post#7


UtterAccess Editor
Posts: 9,991
Joined: 7-December 09
From: St Augustine, FL


Hi Albert,
This is new in 2010 correct? Agreed, anchoring is great.
Some creative programming can accomplish the same in previous versions, I believe, but it's a bit of work.
Cheers,
Go to the top of the page
 
BananaRepublic
post Jul 5 2011, 07:31 AM
Post#8


Dungeon Cleaner
Posts: 1,520
Joined: 16-June 07
From: Banana Republic


Jack - I believe the anchoring was introduced in 2007.
WIW - I've never used the ribbon; just the properties sheet on the Format tab. There, there's only two properties; Vertical Anchoring and Horitzonal Anchoring and they can have 3 possible values; { Top | Bottom | Both } and { Left | Right | Both }. The 9 buttons you see in Albert's screenshot corresponds to a unique combination of those two properties.
Note that in 2010's web database, though, the options are only { Top | Both } and { Left | Both }. This is not as big deal because on a web form, we're already using HTML tables so having Bottom and Right is kind of redundant.
Go to the top of the page
 
AlbertKallal
post Jul 5 2011, 07:44 AM
Post#9


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 2,813
Joined: 12-April 07
From: Edmonton, Alberta Canada


Actually, the feature arrived in 2007.
It was perhaps was in preparation for the web in 2010. However, this type of layout is standard for web and even desktop .net forms.
We having control anchoring, but are missing what is called control docking (that means the control stays in one spot, but all sides will grow.
The control anchoring works better in 2010 due to if you have a set of text boxes without labels - this worked poor in 2007 (at least it did for me).
So the ribbon shot from above exists in 2007
About the only 2010 feature I used in the above was the right most button with a down arrow graphic. A 2010 buttons support text + graphics in controls (I cannot remember if 2007 does).
So, this anchoring feature is available in 2007, but my experience is that 2010 worked much better for me in some cases especially when controls were part of a control layout and without labels (this I recall did not work well in 2007).
It is a very neat feature.
The following screen shot is form access 2007 using this feature:

And larger:

Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
kallal@msn.com
Go to the top of the page
 
khalakmu
post Jul 5 2011, 02:20 PM
Post#10



Posts: 251
Joined: 31-July 10



HI,

Yves, Jleach, BananRepublic, and Albert... Zillion Thanks to ALL OF YOU... Appreciate
giving me depth of know how... also i am sorry that somebody had asked this question before
me but somehow I did not find I.. repeated.. very clear explanation..
Thanks Albert.. so much taking time and explaining me..

Khalak
Go to the top of the page
 
AdamAl
post Jul 8 2011, 08:11 AM
Post#11



Posts: 49
Joined: 7-December 10



Hi JLeach,
I'm designing a form right now and I actually posted this same question on another forum, here in UtterAccess.
You sound like you've given this issue some thought, so I'd like to ask you...
If I'm reading your post correctly, you say that, assuming a user is looking at a 1024 x 768 resolution, you maintain a form size of 8.5" x 5". From another post, you mentioned that you feel this leaves a generous amount of space so the form doesn't look cramped.
But when I look at an 8.5 x 5 form in 1024 x 768 resolution, I feel there's still plenty of room to increase the size of the form. If I wasn't too concerned about the form appearing too "cramped" in the screen, it looks to me that a form can be as large as 10" x 6.5" and still get away with some small space on the sides.
Is this correct?
If not, if you weren't too worried about the form looking cramped, and you don't want your user to scroll, for a 1024 x 768 resolution, what do you feel the maximum form size could be?
Many Thanks,
Adam
Go to the top of the page
 


Custom Search


RSSSearch   Top   Lo-Fi    27th May 2019 - 02:15 AM