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> 2010 Security Guidance, Access 2010    
 
   
phisaw
post Jun 9 2017, 07:05 PM
Post#1



Posts: 271
Joined: 3-April 08



I am looking for information on securing a 2010 Access database. I've been working with Access for about 25 years,
nothing as extensive as what you experts do, but enough to be familiar with many aspects to get a working user-friendly
database. I've always created a front-end/back-end structure, used the Access user security feature, and code to
limit visibility to menus and to make custom shortcut menus.

My company has migrated to Office 2010 and so I decided to create my latest database in this version. I have everything
in place and am ready to set restrictions to menus, ribbon, navigation pane, etc. I have been researching and have found
several confusing, comprehensive, difficult ways to make this happen. There seems to be many aspects to take into account,
such as, if you write code to limit one area, users can then use keystrokes to get beyond the code. If you save the
database as one type, users can copy to another format to gain access. Due to the mass confusion,
I have even read where others have considered reverting back to a 2003 version.

My question to all the experts out there is, should I just revert back to 2003 and use methods I'm familiar with
or can anyone suggest a fairly simple method to prevent users from gaining access to the main ribbon,
creating a custom ribbon, and restrict access to the navigation pane? If I should continue in 2010,
I'm not asking anyone to do the work for me, just some clear guidance that I can understand to help me along.

Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated, especially as confused as I am now.
Thanks in advance,
Pam
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DanielPineault
post Jun 9 2017, 07:48 PM
Post#2


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 5,451
Joined: 30-June 11



See if http://www.devhut.net/2016/09/01/securing-...base-front-end/ doesn't offer a couple strategies.

--------------------
Daniel Pineault (2010-2017 Microsoft MVP)
Professional Help: http://www.cardaconsultants.com
Free MS Access Code, Tips, Tricks and Samples: http://www.devhut.net

* Design should never say "Look at me". It should always say "Look at this". -- David Craib
* A user interface is like a joke, if you have to explain it, it's not that good! -- Martin LeBlanc


All code samples, demonstration databases, links,... are provided 'AS IS' and are to be used at your own risk! Take the necessary steps to check, validate ...
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theDBguy
post Jun 9 2017, 08:22 PM
Post#3


Access Wiki and Forums Moderator
Posts: 71,225
Joined: 19-June 07
From: SunnySandyEggo


Hi Pam,

It may depend on what your database application needs, but I don't see any reason why you can't move on to 2010 from 2003. As Daniel pointed out, there are plenty of options to secure a 2010 database too.

Just my 2 cents...

--------------------
Just my 2 cents... "And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know" - Kansas
Microsoft Access MVP | Access Website | Access Blog | Email
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DanielPineault
post Jun 9 2017, 08:33 PM
Post#4


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 5,451
Joined: 30-June 11



I never directly answered your question. No, I see no advantage to reverting to 2003 over 2010, or any other version for that matter. Actually, it is easier to crack older version than newer ones.

--------------------
Daniel Pineault (2010-2017 Microsoft MVP)
Professional Help: http://www.cardaconsultants.com
Free MS Access Code, Tips, Tricks and Samples: http://www.devhut.net

* Design should never say "Look at me". It should always say "Look at this". -- David Craib
* A user interface is like a joke, if you have to explain it, it's not that good! -- Martin LeBlanc


All code samples, demonstration databases, links,... are provided 'AS IS' and are to be used at your own risk! Take the necessary steps to check, validate ...
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phisaw
post Jun 10 2017, 05:00 PM
Post#5



Posts: 271
Joined: 3-April 08



Thanks DBGuy and Daniel for responding to my request.

Daniel - I've looked at the page you recommended on your site and like the way you have outlined the steps needed to secure the front end. I see I have much to do. In my 2003 databases, I used popup shortcut menus that the users could right click. After much thought, I think I can get away with command buttons on the forms for users to complete any tasks needed and eliminate the need to create a custom ribbon (I hope!).

Thanks again for the detailed advice. I've always received much valued help from the knowledgeable folks here at UtterAccess.
Please standby, I'm sure I'll have questions!

Thanks,
Pam
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ScottGem
post Jun 10 2017, 05:25 PM
Post#6


UtterAccess VIP / UA Clown
Posts: 32,182
Joined: 21-January 04
From: LI, NY


QUOTE
suggest a fairly simple method to prevent users from gaining access to the main ribbon,
creating a custom ribbon, and restrict access to the navigation pane?


Yes, convert to accde!

If you hide the main ribbon and Nav Pane and convert to and deploy as an accde, you pretty much accomplish those tasks.

Add a login form, Access levels (see my blog on Login Security with VBA) and use that to control what forms the user can and can't see or what access they have within a form.

Another thing to consider is which version of Office. In my company most users get Office Standard and the Access runtime. Only developers get Office Pro. Users with runtime can't get into Design modes.

--------------------
Scott <>
Scottgem's Blog
Microsoft Access MVP since 2007
Author: Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA
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phisaw
post Jun 12 2017, 12:35 PM
Post#7



Posts: 271
Joined: 3-April 08



Hi Scott,

Thank you for replying with suggestions, also. I've already found your blog and have implemented a table and login form - much easier than the procedure I previously used. Thank you!

I keep reading about Access runtime. I'm not familiar with what that is and haven't had time to do any research, but we are using Access through Citrix and the version is in MS Office Professional Plus 2010.

I will make the changes as you all have recommended and convert to accde.

Thanks again for your time and help.
Pam
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theDBguy
post Jun 12 2017, 01:54 PM
Post#8


Access Wiki and Forums Moderator
Posts: 71,225
Joined: 19-June 07
From: SunnySandyEggo


Hi Pam,

You can go a step further by renaming your ACCDE to ACCDR before giving it to your users.

Obviously, users can simply rename it back, but for those who do not know they can do so, it's just an extra layer of security.

Good luck!

--------------------
Just my 2 cents... "And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know" - Kansas
Microsoft Access MVP | Access Website | Access Blog | Email
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phisaw
post Jun 12 2017, 03:37 PM
Post#9



Posts: 271
Joined: 3-April 08



Thanks DB Guy - I'll do that!

I really appreciate all the responses and information everyone has given.
Thanks again,
Pam
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phisaw
post Jun 13 2017, 03:00 PM
Post#10



Posts: 271
Joined: 3-April 08



Hi Guys,

I've completed the list below and must be missing something.

I still have abbreviated versions of the File and Home tabs and the Quick Access Toolbar at the top has an arrow with drop-down to customize which takes a user back to the Access options for the current database to enable all the items I disabled. The user can also right-click on the ribbon to open the same Access options window.

Per HansV, these are the steps I've taken:
Select File > Options
Select 'Current Database'
Select startup form - "fLogin"
Clear the following check boxes:
'Use Access Special Keys'
'Enable Layout View'
'Enable design changes for tables in Datasheet view'
'Display Navigation Pane'
'Allow Full Menus'
'Allow Default Shortcut Menus'
Convert to accde

I would like to completely remove the ribbon to gain more real estate and prevent the QAT dropdown or right-click options from being displayed. Will someone please tell me how I can accomplish this?

Any additional information is greatly appreciated.
Thanks again,
Pam
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ScottGem
post Jun 14 2017, 07:05 AM
Post#11


UtterAccess VIP / UA Clown
Posts: 32,182
Joined: 21-January 04
From: LI, NY


add

DoCmd.ShowToolbar "Ribbon", acToolbarNo

To the On Load event of your Login form.

--------------------
Scott <>
Scottgem's Blog
Microsoft Access MVP since 2007
Author: Microsoft Office Access 2007 VBA
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phisaw
post Jun 14 2017, 09:51 AM
Post#12



Posts: 271
Joined: 3-April 08



Thanks Scott - that did it!

One more thing (I hope) - can you tell me if there is a way to combine all these steps listed below in a command button OnClick event so that when I make changes to my original db, I can have all items taken care of at one time and then convert?

Clear the following check boxes:
'Use Access Special Keys'
'Enable Layout View'
'Enable design changes for tables in Datasheet view'
'Display Navigation Pane'
'Allow Full Menus'
'Allow Default Shortcut Menus'
and
DoCmd.ShowToolbar "Ribbon", acToolbarNo

Thanks for your time and help,
Pam
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theDBguy
post Jun 14 2017, 10:12 AM
Post#13


Access Wiki and Forums Moderator
Posts: 71,225
Joined: 19-June 07
From: SunnySandyEggo


Hi Pam,

I hope this article helps.

Cheers!

--------------------
Just my 2 cents... "And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know" - Kansas
Microsoft Access MVP | Access Website | Access Blog | Email
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phisaw
post Jun 14 2017, 02:52 PM
Post#14



Posts: 271
Joined: 3-April 08



Thanks DBGuy,

That should help me combine all tasks into one command.

Thanks again,
Pam
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theDBguy
post Jun 15 2017, 09:38 AM
Post#15


Access Wiki and Forums Moderator
Posts: 71,225
Joined: 19-June 07
From: SunnySandyEggo


Hi Pam,

You're welcome! We're all happy to assist.

--------------------
Just my 2 cents... "And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know" - Kansas
Microsoft Access MVP | Access Website | Access Blog | Email
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