UtterAccess.com
X   Site Message
(Message will auto close in 2 seconds)

Welcome to UtterAccess! Please ( Login   or   Register )

Custom Search
 
   Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Upgrade From Access 2007? To What?, Access 2007    
 
   
LonesomeDove
post Dec 22 2017, 02:59 PM
Post#1



Posts: 343
Joined: 14-October 10
From: Southeastern Pennsylvania


In 2009, my customer went live with an Access application I built for him using Office 2007. He is now considering upgrading to either Office 2013 or 2016. The application is central to the customer’s business. When the application is down, his business is down.

This post asks two questions: should the user upgrade, and, if so, to which version of Office?

The application is a split database environment with 4 users. They do not have a server; the back end is on one of the user’s machines, which are all running Windows 10.

The Access application has about 5,000 lines of VBA code, 8 main forms (with a number of sub-forms and pop-up forms), and about 20 reports. As an Access application, I would classify it on the low end of medium complexity. The most complex aspect of the application is an interface to Outlook. The application reads emails from Outlook and builds emails that it submits to Outlook for transmission. The application is stable and performing well. The only issues I have dealt with since the application went live is to change tab order on a form, eliminate a mouse click here and there, and other similar minor improvements to user efficiency.

In a meeting with the customer, we identified the following pros and cons to upgrading:

Pros (reasons for upgrading to a later version)
• There is a perceived risk to being out of date. Office 2007 is now 3 versions out of date.

Cons (reasons for staying on Office 2007)
• The present system is working well. It’s fast and reliable. (“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”)
• Although Office 2007 is no longer supported by Microsoft, it is stable due to its long support cycle and the many number of bugs fixed.
• It costs nothing to continue with Office 2007
• There is a risk in upgrading. There may be problems that take time to resolve and render the Access application unusable until the problems are resolved.
• Upgrading costs money. There is the cost of new software licenses and the cost of consulting services.
• There is the possibility of interrupting the customer’s business due to the application being down which upgrade issues are being resolved.

I would appreciate any insight or advice given.

Thanks in advance.
Go to the top of the page
 
GroverParkGeorge
post Dec 22 2017, 06:54 PM
Post#2


UA Admin
Posts: 33,777
Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


The database should continue to work, as is, for some time to come, that's for sure. I have heard of many organizations still using versions of Access all the way back to '97.

From one point of view, therefore, one could say that you're not going to lose functionality by staying with what you have.

That said, Office 2007 is now out of support. You're essentially on your own with regard to problems that might arise. So, there's that consideration, as well as the potential for new security exploits that wouldn't be patched ( I don't know how serious that threat is, but I believe it is not negligible.)

The other thing you mention which I think might be relevant is the possibility of problems that might arise in upgrading individual databases you deploy. As far as I can tell, that would be a minor problem, if at all. Newer versions do appear to be less tolerant of ambiguous or incomplete references in VBA, but cleaning that up is a good idea in any case, IMO. You may encounter problems if one of your databases includes ActiveX controls, some of which may have deprecated,
Go to the top of the page
 
GroverParkGeorge
post Dec 23 2017, 07:01 AM
Post#3


UA Admin
Posts: 33,777
Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


Your concerns about downtime during an upgrade to the newest version of Office are unfounded if you follow sound practices.

First, you develop in your own environment, working with the master copy of the Front End you maintain for that purpose. To do that, of course, you'll need to install the newer version of Access on your computer.

Second, all users continue to work as usual with their existing copies of the Access 2007 Front End.

When you are ready to deploy the upgraded Front End, you have IT install the appropriate Office version on the users' computers and deploy the new version of the Front End you've validated. They can then work with it with minimal risk of disruption.
Go to the top of the page
 
haresfur
post Dec 24 2017, 01:07 AM
Post#4



Posts: 291
Joined: 4-April 12
From: Bendigo, Australia


I think it is important to consider the advantages (or disadvantages) of upgrading the other Office applications. There may be very good reasons to go to newer versions of, say, Powerpoint or Outlook. I'm not sure it would be a good idea to try to meld an old version of Access with a newer version of Outlook.
Go to the top of the page
 
LonesomeDove
post Dec 29 2017, 06:16 PM
Post#5



Posts: 343
Joined: 14-October 10
From: Southeastern Pennsylvania


Gents,

Thanks for your replies and advice.

My customer would be upgrading all Office applications, not just Access. I have already discovered, in my development environment, the troubles brought on by mixing versions. For example, I am using Office 2010 (Word, Access, etc.) with Visio 2007. All applications work, but when switching to or from Visio, there a bit of wasted time as Office does some "configuring." Sigh.

Go to the top of the page
 
GroverParkGeorge
post Dec 30 2017, 08:14 AM
Post#6


UA Admin
Posts: 33,777
Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


With Access, there are potentially more significant problems. It is possible to introduce features into an accdb with a later version of Access which make that accdb unusable with earlier versions.

Therefore, if YOU, the developer, work on any accdb with Access 2010 or newer, there is a good chance your 2007 users simply can't even open it any longer. Bad juju.

Go to the top of the page
 


Custom Search
RSSSearch   Top   Lo-Fi    19th October 2018 - 02:40 PM