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> Is There Function To Check Useless Table,form Or Etc In Databas?, Access 2003    
 
   
sakijung
post Jan 28 2020, 10:26 AM
Post#1



Posts: 86
Joined: 1-January 05



I new in access and forget which one is use this table for queries or reports or forms. Or sometimes I copy codes from others but useless. It is easy if I have function or vba code to use or link in here to read. I can delete them very quickly and not use change query names then click form to check query like these.
Thank you.
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GroverParkGeorge
post Jan 28 2020, 01:26 PM
Post#2


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From: Newcastle, WA


It's not too easy using native Access tools. However, there are third party tools that can quickly identified unused code at least.

My favorite in this area is called MZ-Tools. It is not free, but it does an outstanding job on VBA. I believe there are other tools, such as V-Tools, with similar functions.

I know of no similar method of identifying unused objects like tables, queries, forms, or reports, though.

I typically rename suspected objects by pre-pending a "Z_" in front of the object name and working with the Access Relational Database Application for a while. If it breaks trying to use that object, the error will identify it.


This post has been edited by GroverParkGeorge: Jan 28 2020, 01:28 PM

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My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I did business for 20 years.
How to Ask a Good Question
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sakijung
post Jan 28 2020, 06:48 PM
Post#3



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Thank you for your guiding. I should be less lazy to write down, too.
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WildBird
post Jan 28 2020, 07:04 PM
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Joined: 19-August 03
From: Auckland, Little Australia


I have used MZTools, the free version, and it does a great job on code. Finds dead variables etc.

Its hard to check tables and queries etc, as often there are queries that are built dynamically to look at them, so it is hard to find references to them.

Agree with George. Take a back up, and then rename things, one at a time, and run as much code etc as you can to see if it breaks.


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PhilS
post Jan 29 2020, 03:19 AM
Post#5



Posts: 679
Joined: 26-May 15
From: The middle of Germany


QUOTE
I new in access and forget which one is use this table for queries or reports or forms.

This happens to experienced developers too!
In Access there is a built-in functionality for that: In the Ribbon "Database Tools" - "Objects Dependencies".
Unfortunately, this only helps with top level objects like tables, queries, forms etc. and it does not search the VBA code.

If you want to check your application for all the textual references to any object, including table fields and form controls in Access, you need an additional tool.
UA user datAdrenaline built the SearchForText tool you can copy to your database and then use it to find text terms.

We recently published a commercial Find and Replace tool for Microsoft Access. It's an add-in that is automatically available in Access for any database you work on when it is installed.
This post has been edited by PhilS: Jan 29 2020, 03:24 AM

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A professional Access developer tool: Find and Replace for Access and VBA
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GroverParkGeorge
post Jan 29 2020, 08:56 AM
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Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


I've been trying out Phillip's new tool. So far it looks good. It's fast, has an efficient interface and it is easy to use.

I've been looking for a replacement for Rick Fisher's Find and Replace for a while. Rick's tool was the go to for years, but it's no longer supported. I'm pretty sure I'll be recommending this one sometime soon.

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My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I did business for 20 years.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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