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> Documenting Your Database, Any Version    
 
   
jklinephd
post Aug 23 2019, 10:20 AM
Post#1



Posts: 78
Joined: 11-September 07
From: Missouri


I suspect that I know the answer to this, but I thought I'd ask those who know more than I.

Is there anyway to better document a database that I am developing? I understand how to comment VBA code. But I am talking about documenting Queries, Reports, Forms. Are their techniques you've developed. Are their external tools that help. What I want is something similar tot he Commenting tool in Excel, Right click on a Form, a Query, or a Report's title, then a box pops up and I can add a comment. Maybe an explanatory comment or a note to myself as I may be working on a query for several days. I know about the properties option, but that is no good.

I am also aware that I can create a word document or Wordpad document and copy code and comment there, but that is not well integrated. I find this particularly difficult when I work with SQL since I don't think there is a way to create comments that are ignored.

I am not a developer or someone that does this for a living. I have to work with Access as part of my job and as a tool to help me do my job, but my training is, well, limited.

Thanks

Jeff
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GroverParkGeorge
post Aug 23 2019, 10:58 AM
Post#2


UA Admin
Posts: 35,891
Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


There is a tool available to work with SQL in stored queries. It's not free, but I like it a great deal. And at $9.99 (US) it's also a good deal.

It only work with SQL, unfortunately, so manually inserting comments in your VBA is still required there.

--------------------
My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I do business.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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dale.fye
post Aug 23 2019, 11:49 AM
Post#3



Posts: 161
Joined: 28-March 18
From: Virginia


I have, in several large projects, included a table (appDatabaseObjects) which contained the name of the object, one or more columns for dates created or edited (as those dates are not really reliable when you simply look in the navigation pane) and object description. This has helped me, when I came back to the application 6 months or more later to understand the purpose of the object, it's interactions with other objects, and any other notes.

I've found that I generally don't do a very good job of keeping that table up to date, but it works well for queries. I generally document forms, reports, and modules with remarks placed in the code associated with those objects.

--------------------
Dale Fye
Microsoft Access MVP 2013-2016
Developing Solutions, LLC
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kfield7
post Aug 23 2019, 01:07 PM
Post#4



Posts: 1,003
Joined: 12-November 03
From: Iowa Lot


Free stuff:

search on this site for "analyzer" by Strive4Peace.

Also, Access has built in [Database tools] -> [database documenter]

Conrad tools had a query documenter that worked with older versions of Access. Not sure it's still available. I'm sure one of my older dbs has this module somewhere.

I believe all of these can output to Word, so you can annotate as needed.

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isladogs
post Aug 23 2019, 03:13 PM
Post#5


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 1,704
Joined: 4-June 18
From: Somerset, UK


You can add a description to any database object without using any external tools.
Change the navigation pane to details view, click on the object and enter a description.
I often use this to note the version when the object is added or modified and its purpose.

--------------------
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jklinephd
post Aug 28 2019, 01:44 PM
Post#6



Posts: 78
Joined: 11-September 07
From: Missouri


Thanks for the suggestions and sorry for the delay in responding. I cannot find a live link for Strive4Peace's tool. Access SQL Editor looks interesting, but is more suited to those working strictly in SQL. The other suggestions also look interesting, but not quite what i want.

What I really want is Microsoft to add some capabilities that go beyond Database Documenter. [censored], I'd like just to be able to add sticky notes to objects to help me track what I am doing on a project. Maybe along with some more advanced tools.

I am probably going to start using a word document to help me track things. Its just not that easy to copy names of queries out of Access, etc.

Thanks

Jeff
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kfield7
post Aug 29 2019, 03:00 PM
Post#7



Posts: 1,003
Joined: 12-November 03
From: Iowa Lot


On a few of my dbs I have a design table where I log changes I've made.

So no, the info is not attached to an object like a post-it, but it can be found easily.

You might create something like:

tblDBNotes
NotesPK auto
NoteDate
Object
ObjectType
ChangeMade
ReasonForChange
Comment

and create a form for it. Maybe a button somewhere that is only available when the DB is "in design mode", or when you're logged in, or something like that.
Your form could even open the object from a button.

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kfield7
post Aug 29 2019, 03:08 PM
Post#8



Posts: 1,003
Joined: 12-November 03
From: Iowa Lot


Crystal (Strive4Peace) has some tools here.
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