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> Counting Employees Production And Deducting Downtimes, Access 2016    
 
   
VBStudent
post Jun 10 2019, 07:10 PM
Post#1



Posts: 68
Joined: 17-April 16



Help Please!

Our employees in the office are required to work certain number of accounts a day. Some 80, some 60, and some 40, depending on complexity of their work. Now, when there are downtimes (Like system issues, training, meetings, or they leave early), we are supposed to deduct those time so it doesn't count against their production. I get the number of accounts they work from another software, but my issue is applying these time deductions and calculating the correct number of accounts they have to work for that specific day.

For example, Sara is required to work 80 accounts a day (8 hours shift). She only works 4 hours on Monday, works 38 accounts and leaves for the day. Her production expectation for Monday should be 40 (4 hours worth of work). Now this is a straight forward example, but it can be any number of time deductions like 10 or 15 minutes a day.

I have all the production numbers in one table and the time deductions on another linking them by date. I just can't figure out how to do the calculation on a query so that it gives me the number of accounts they should work after all the time deductions. Hope I make sense. Thank you!

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RJD
post Jun 10 2019, 07:58 PM
Post#2


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Posts: 9,735
Joined: 25-October 10
From: Gulf South USA


Hi: Without the tables, or even some example data, this can only be addressed in general.

It would seem you could develop a Totals (grouping) query on the deductions table, grouping on date and employee, and summing on minutes deducted, then link that in another query to the production table by date and employee (given that the required and actual performance is available there). With this, you should be able to calculate minutes deducted divided by 480 (minutes in 8 hours) to get the percentage of accounts that should be worked by that employee that day. This times the required accounts per day compared to the actual accounts worked should give you the over/under value you seek - for each employee, for each day.

At least, that's what it seems given your description, if I understood it correctly.

See if you can do something like this with queries. If you have a problem with this, perhaps you could post a db with some dummy example data (nothing sensitive, of course). Compact and zip the file and attach it with a description of where you are having problems getting what you need. But give it a try first, if my analysis seems correct.

HTH
Joe

--------------------
"Each problem that I solved became a rule, which served afterwards to solve other problems."
"You just keep pushing. You just keep pushing. I made every mistake that could be made. But I just kept pushing."

Rene Descartes 1596-1650 (Mathematician and Philosopher)
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MadPiet
post Jun 10 2019, 10:05 PM
Post#3



Posts: 3,171
Joined: 27-February 09



Except, to be fair, you'd have to subtract out any downtime. If you store the "outage" times as (startTime, endTime), then you can just calculate the actual "possible" working time as [TimeOut] - [TimeIn] and then subtract any outage time. If you multiply that times the expected production per minute, you'd get an expected output value that you can compare to the employee's actual production.
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RJD
post Jun 11 2019, 12:47 AM
Post#4


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Posts: 9,735
Joined: 25-October 10
From: Gulf South USA


Thanks, Pieter. You are correct. Looks like you got the step I skipped over. Thanks for catching me.

Regards,
Joe

--------------------
"Each problem that I solved became a rule, which served afterwards to solve other problems."
"You just keep pushing. You just keep pushing. I made every mistake that could be made. But I just kept pushing."

Rene Descartes 1596-1650 (Mathematician and Philosopher)
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VBStudent
post Jun 11 2019, 05:12 PM
Post#5



Posts: 68
Joined: 17-April 16



Thank you very much, Joe and Pieter! I'm going to try and do what Joe said. I wouldn't need to track their time in and out because I always get their total downtime anyways. I'm going to give this a shot and will get back with you guys if I encounter any problems. Thank you so much!
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RJD
post Jun 11 2019, 05:42 PM
Post#6


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Posts: 9,735
Joined: 25-October 10
From: Gulf South USA


You are very welcome, from both of us. Let us know if we can be of further assistance as you work through this.

Regards,
Joe

--------------------
"Each problem that I solved became a rule, which served afterwards to solve other problems."
"You just keep pushing. You just keep pushing. I made every mistake that could be made. But I just kept pushing."

Rene Descartes 1596-1650 (Mathematician and Philosopher)
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