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> Implications Of New Microsoft 365 For Access Development/users?, Any Version    
 
   
compdinosaur
post Mar 31 2020, 05:45 AM
Post#1



Posts: 300
Joined: 29-August 07
From: Rockville, MD


Today I received the announcement for Microsoft 365. What are the implications for Access users? I now maintain and develop a relatively small Access database for a library in a senior community (around 3,000) books. This is a frontend and backend on a PC and not on a server. I am the only one here that I know who can develop or maintain this database. What options do I have going forward to either continue to use access and train others in it's use or to use some other "free" product? I don't wish to reenter all of the existing data.

--------------------
Barbara
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Jeff B.
post Mar 31 2020, 07:05 AM
Post#2


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From: Pacific NorthWet


In case you haven't explored this, Access includes the ability to export data to Excel, as well as to other formats. Depending on what 'other' db product you're considering, you might not need to 're-enter' the data manually.

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Regards

Jeff Boyce
Microsoft Access MVP (2002-2015)

Mention of hardware or software is, in no way, an endorsement thereof. The FTC of the USA made this disclaimer necessary/possible.
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FrankRuperto
post Mar 31 2020, 08:09 AM
Post#3



Posts: 968
Joined: 21-September 14
From: Tampa, Florida USA


Hello Barbara,

What JeffB said in his post is true. I don't see any link in the Microsoft 365 announcement that offers a long-term free version. Perhaps it's just a free 30-day trial version:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-3...-subscriptions/

I would also like to know which version of Access you are using because all installations of Office 2019 now default to the 64-bit version and you are better off using the 32-bit version.
This post has been edited by FrankRuperto: Mar 31 2020, 08:35 AM

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Currently supporting pawnbrokers that use my store management system developed with Access 2010 on Windows7. Experienced with Informix, Oracle & PostgreSQL db's.
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GroverParkGeorge
post Mar 31 2020, 08:14 AM
Post#4


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From: Newcastle, WA


I doubt it will have any impact one way or the other except for licensing.

Microsoft is moving toward the subscription model, making it harder and harder to purchase a perpetual license.

Other than that, you should not be impacted much, if at all, until you decide to upgrade to a new version.

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My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I did business for 20 years.
How to Ask a Good Question
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FrankRuperto
post Mar 31 2020, 03:39 PM
Post#5



Posts: 968
Joined: 21-September 14
From: Tampa, Florida USA


The ironically funny thing is that Access is not mentioned or included in any of the Micosoft 365 (MS365) subscription plans offered:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-3...eProductsRegion

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Currently supporting pawnbrokers that use my store management system developed with Access 2010 on Windows7. Experienced with Informix, Oracle & PostgreSQL db's.
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isladogs
post Mar 31 2020, 04:09 PM
Post#6


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From: Somerset, UK


There is nothing in the name change from Office 365 to Microsoft 365 that will have any effect on Access databases.
It will also not affect anyone who has a perpetual licence.
Basically its nothing more than a marketing strategy.

--------------------
Colin (Mendip Data Systems)
Website, email
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GroverParkGeorge
post Mar 31 2020, 05:20 PM
Post#7


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And a really bad marketing move at that.


--------------------
My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I did business for 20 years.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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FrankRuperto
post Mar 31 2020, 05:55 PM
Post#8



Posts: 968
Joined: 21-September 14
From: Tampa, Florida USA


One more of many frequent changes made to Office that further confuses everyone. At the bottom of the MS365 webpage the following footnotes appear.

QUOTE
1. Compatible with Windows 10 or later. For complete requirements for PC and Mac see system requirements.
2. This plan works with Office 2019, Office 2016, Office 2013, and Office 2011 for Mac. Previous versions of Office, such as Office 2010 and Office 2007 may work with Microsoft 365 with reduced functionality. This compatibility with Office does not include the Office 365 F1 plans.
3. After your 1-month free trial, you will be charged the applicable subscription fee. Credit card required. Cancel any time to stop future charges.



Attached File(s)
Attached File  OfficeSupportMatrix.PNG ( 136.81K )Number of downloads: 6
 

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Currently supporting pawnbrokers that use my store management system developed with Access 2010 on Windows7. Experienced with Informix, Oracle & PostgreSQL db's.
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AlbertKallal
post Mar 31 2020, 08:47 PM
Post#9


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Joined: 12-April 07
From: Edmonton, Alberta Canada


And to add to this?

the free edition of Access (aka: runtime edition) can still be used on computers that don't have office or access installed.

So, for a lot of clients, they would forgo buying the more expensive version of office that included Access. This would save a company a lot of money. Thus, as a general rule they only needed to buy one copy of Access (for you the developer). All the rest of the computers then could install + use the free runtime edition.

However, as they move towards a subscription based model?

How office and even Access works and functions is the same as before. The only real change here is that most (if not all) plans now include Access as part of office.
I suppose in a way this is a good thing, since once again, MOST users of office will now have Access to play with.

Then they start to develop something in Access.
Then it starts to become a valuable application.

Then they start calling developers like me to extend and take it over to the next level.
(or the person that created the application retires or moves on).

So, all in all, I don't mind this change in office.

About the only downside is the confusing here!

So, Access now tends to be included in office, and thus the "need" or "desire" to spend extra time making sure your application can work with the free edition of Access is not such a valued effort on your part (because once again we can assume that all machines with office will now have Access - thus no need to spend the effort and time deploying the free runtime edition of Access matters all that much anymore).

R
Albert
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