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> Pie Chart Help, Show Placeholder For Zero Values., Office 2013    
 
   
Vaupell
post Jul 16 2019, 07:44 AM
Post#1



Posts: 11
Joined: 6-September 18



Hi all, (hmm unable to select office 2016/365..)

I'm trying to create some task status overviews with Pie charts.

I have 6 tasks for each pie chart.

1) I want the pie chart to show 6 equally sized fields, regardless of value.

2) I want the parts of the chart with ZERO/NULL value to just show a blank/white space

Attached is an example.
Chart values at top, and 4 charts.
Chart 1 = yes this i like.
Chart 2,3,4 = this is no good.

Ideally Row/chart 3 has values of 1 and 0,, but is not showing blank fixed areas for the 0's..

what to do..

Attached File  picharts.png ( 47.48K )Number of downloads: 1
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Debaser
post Jul 16 2019, 07:50 AM
Post#2



Posts: 143
Joined: 11-October 18



You'd have to plot 1 for each section and then use code to remove the fill for the zero slices. In my opinion, it would be much simpler, and at least as clear I suspect, to use 4 bar charts with A-F on the category axis of the first one, and that axis hidden on the others.
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Vaupell
post Jul 16 2019, 08:15 AM
Post#3



Posts: 11
Joined: 6-September 18



yes, nice suggestion but thats not excaktly great for a large overview, hence the pie charts..

This is the complete picture.. censured wink.gif

Attached File  pic2.png ( 132.02K )Number of downloads: 6

This post has been edited by Vaupell: Jul 16 2019, 08:50 AM
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GroverParkGeorge
post Jul 16 2019, 09:02 AM
Post#4


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From: Newcastle, WA


A pie chart shows each value as a percentage of the whole, does it not?

So, how big would the slice for a 0 value be? It's 0% of the whole being measured. There's nothing to show. It's 0% of the values in the pie and therefore 0 wide. If you try to force those 0 values into the pie chart anyway, that's going to skew the size of other slices in some way as a result. That makes the whole thing inaccurate.

I agree. Pie charts are nice in some situations, but this appears not to be one of them.

If you want to add a legend showing the actual values, and throw in 0s as appropriate, that's probably going to be more accurate, I suspect.

You might get some insight from discussions like this.


--------------------
My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I do business.
How to Ask a Good Question
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GroverParkGeorge
post Jul 16 2019, 09:08 AM
Post#5


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Re-reading the original post leaves me even more opposed to using a pie chart here.

"1) I want the pie chart to show 6 equally sized fields, regardless of value."


The whole POINT to a pie chart is that the slices are NOT equi-sized. This means a pie chart is quite inappropriate unless you use some static value (like the 1 previously suggested) and that's pointless, is it not?

--------------------
My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I do business.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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Vaupell
post Jul 16 2019, 09:09 AM
Post#6



Posts: 11
Joined: 6-September 18



Allright, thanks for the reply..

I will just close it here, and raise it somewhere else. not to waste anyone's time.


Thank you for your suggestions, taken to consideration.
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GroverParkGeorge
post Jul 16 2019, 09:17 AM
Post#7


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You can't change the nature of Pie Charts. They work because the size of each slice reflects the size of the underlying value. That is how they are designed to work.

Why even bother to show the same size for each slice? Create a graphic image like the one in your screen shot and use that instead. It'll do the task you want and save the hassle of trying to fake it each time.

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My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I do business.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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Debaser
post Jul 16 2019, 10:16 AM
Post#8



Posts: 143
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As it happens, the one reason that a pie chart might be acceptable here is that the slice size is not really representative of anything. (the largest problem with pies being determining relative size)

But there is no way I can think of, other than code, to remove the fill from points that should be 0.
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GroverParkGeorge
post Jul 16 2019, 10:27 AM
Post#9


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Okay, so that's an angle that didn't occur to me. The pie chart is NOT a real pie chart, but a way to say, "non-zero value" or "zero value". And that's something you can do.

Use an immediate IIf() in the query sort of like this.

PieSlice: Iif([FieldOne]>0, 1, 0) to return either 1 or 0. You can assign 0 to the color white.

--------------------
My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I do business.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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GroverParkGeorge
post Jul 16 2019, 11:28 AM
Post#10


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From: Newcastle, WA


On further thought, since this is in Excel, perhaps you will need to use an Excel formula that does the same thing as the IIf() in a query, depending on how you're getting the data into the Excel sheet for analysis.

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My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I do business.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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