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> Move Access To The Cloud, Access 2016    
 
   
Ray
post May 23 2020, 09:37 AM
Post#1



Posts: 577
Joined: 31-January 00



I have a front end database on each user's pc and back end database on a file server. Now the file server will be moved to onedrive. Is there any simple way to amend the current database to onedrive? Any suggestion is appreciated.
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FrankRuperto
post May 23 2020, 09:44 AM
Post#2



Posts: 1,099
Joined: 21-September 14
From: Tampa, Florida USA


OneDrive cannot be used for the backend, it will quickly become corrupted.

--------------------
Currently supporting pawnbrokers that use my store management system developed with Access 2010 on Windows7. Experienced with Informix, Oracle & PostgreSQL db's.
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theDBguy
post May 23 2020, 09:56 AM
Post#3


UA Moderator
Posts: 78,461
Joined: 19-June 07
From: SunnySandyEggo


Hi. I agree with Frank. If you must use the Internet for the backend, I would recommend upgrading it to SQL Server or Azure or MySQL or the like.

--------------------
Just my 2 cents... "And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know" - Kansas
Access Website | Access Blog | Email
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nvogel
post May 23 2020, 09:58 AM
Post#4



Posts: 1,120
Joined: 26-January 14
From: London, UK


Migrate the database to a SQL DBMS that you can run in the cloud. SQL Server or PostgreSQL are both good options. You can still use your Access application as the front end.
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Ray
post May 23 2020, 10:36 AM
Post#5



Posts: 577
Joined: 31-January 00



Thanks for your suggestions. As our company is quite small and have no technical people to maintain this new server, how complicate to transform current database to SQL. Can we use VPN to access the company's server while out of office.
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GroverParkGeorge
post May 23 2020, 11:19 AM
Post#6


UA Admin
Posts: 37,468
Joined: 20-June 02
From: Newcastle, WA


Yes, you can VPN to the desktops in your organization and run your Access Front End from there.

Migrating data to SQL Server is, in one sense quite easy to do. Microsoft offers a tool, called SSMA, to do that.

However, making it work properly is a different matter. You should benefit from some background readings, including the one in my signature. Others include this one. A search will, no doubt, turn up several other excellent resources.

--------------------
My Real Name Is George. Grover Park Consulting is where I did business for 20 years.
How to Ask a Good Question
Beginning SQL Server
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AlbertKallal
post May 23 2020, 11:25 AM
Post#7


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 3,101
Joined: 12-April 07
From: Edmonton, Alberta Canada


A VPN will work fine, especially if you using SQL server.

However, you might find it less work to adopt Terminal Services. This would allow you to continue to use your split setup, and any user anyplace with that VPN (even Wi-Fi at a coffee shop) would be able to use your application.

However, it sounds like you moving in the direction to drop the sever, and place everything in the cloud. However, a split database will not work if the back end is an accDB file (it needs to be some kind of SQL server).

The problem is that moving your data to SQL server, and making your front end work with SQL can be some work and learning on your part.

In fact, if this was just your local office network? Then moving the back end data to SQL server is not all that much work. About 99% of your forms (and even VBA code) will and should work as before. However, you have to learn some SQL server skills, and that is effort and time on your part.

However, introduction of a VPN is another HUGE deal. It not a huge deal from a technical point of view, and the VPN will not really change what you have to learn in regards to SQL server.

However, because a VPN is VERY VERY much slower than your local and typical office network? Then to achieve good performance, then MUCH MORE work is required to make Access work well over a VPN.

In fact, even with SQL server as your back end? You will OFTEN still find the performance too slow.

As a result?

If you looking to run your application from remote locations, or any place and any time, and with any internet connection?

I strong suggest that you adopt terminal services. Not only will the performance be ok with a VPN, but you also don’t have to adopt SQL server. In other words, your application can stay quite much the same as it is now – you don’t have to modify it, and you don’t have to learn + setup SQL server. And worse, even after doing all that work to adopt SQL server, you STILL find that performance is usually too slow over a VPN.

So, the lowest risk, the best performance, and you not having to modify your existing application? You get all of these benefits by adopting terminal services.

However, adopting terminal services means and suggests that you will have a server running at your office that all users can then use to “run” + “use” your Access application.

I have a number of access + SQL server applications, and they tend to run too slow over the VPN, so we use terminal services.

So, the problem here is while a VPN will work, it in near all cases going to be too slow – and that EVEN includes if your application is using SQL server as the back end.

While terminal services is not cheap, it still almost ALWAYS much less cost than the time + efforts you need to make Access work well with SQL server. Toss in the VPN? Well, now the amount of work required shoots up significantly for the Access developer.

So, the problem is that if this was you local office network? Well, then your split database don't need to be changed. And if you decided to migrate the back end to SQL server? Again, since that local office network runs very fast, then your access changes will be minimal. However, if you introduce a VPN, then the changes required to your access application will increase and shoot up by significant amounts. So you have a double challenge.

I really don't recommend much of any other solution then terminal services, or some kind of "remote desktop" technology.


Regards,
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP 2003-2017)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada

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nvogel
post May 23 2020, 12:46 PM
Post#8



Posts: 1,120
Joined: 26-January 14
From: London, UK


Albert is perhaps a little too quick to dismiss the VPN option. Plenty of people do successfully work with remote database servers but a lot depends on what you are doing and the design of the application. A badly designed database application can be extremely inefficient even on a fast network. A browser-based application is certainly a preferable way to work with a cloud database. That would mean discarding your Access application however.

I just wanted to add that your company doesn't need to be capable of supporting a "server" as such. Microsoft, Amazon and Google all offer serverless SQL database services, which means you create a database instance and just deal with SQL with no OS to worry about.

This post has been edited by nvogel: May 23 2020, 12:47 PM
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AlbertKallal
post May 23 2020, 01:54 PM
Post#9


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 3,101
Joined: 12-April 07
From: Edmonton, Alberta Canada


A VPN to SQL server with client side Access can work. but it is SIGNFICANT amounts of extra work. And it is SIGNFICANT amounts of extra work compared to a local office LAN as opposed to having a VPN between you and the SQL server.

It can work - but even most of my access to SQL server applications will not work all that well over a VPN.

It comes down to the "amounts" of work and effort to make a VPN perform well.

A VPN is much, but much much slower then that el-cheapo office LAN. This issue simply cannot be ignored.

If you have an existing Access to SQL server setup working well over a VPN then so be it. However, such setups don't work well unless significant amounts of work is spent on the access client application.

I been testing and working with Access to SQL server OVER the internet since 2004. (16 years). A VPN can work, it just a question of how much time and effort you want to put into the application, and specifically into making Access work well with such a setup.

R
Albert
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