UtterAccess.com
X   Site Message
(Message will auto close in 2 seconds)

Welcome to UtterAccess! Please ( Login   or   Register )

Custom Search
 
   Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Table Linking, Access 2016    
 
   
eacollie
post Oct 27 2019, 02:24 AM
Post#1



Posts: 729
Joined: 15-January 05
From: Tennessee


Not sure if this is the correct forum; if not, perhaps someone can direct me.

I'm hoping someone will be able to explain a concept to me about Access 365.

I have a database that has gone from 2007 to 2013 and now to 365. It's split into a forms file (on individual computers) and a data file (on the server).

Historically there were three data files; I'll call them A, B and C. These were incorporated by linking the tables in B and C to A, and the forms file then linked to A. This worked fine for Access 2007 and 2013.

Now, this is the concept I'm not sure I understand. In Access 365, when I try to link the data file (A) to the forms file, it shows A, B and C data files. When I try to link to just A (which has linked tables from B and C) it doesn't seem to see the tables in B or C. When I link all three data files, the tables in B and C that are linked to A appear twice (tableA and tableA1).

I hope this makes sense and that someone can explain what is happening here and how to ensure things are being saved to the correct tables.

Thank you!
Go to the top of the page
 
DanielPineault
post Oct 27 2019, 06:23 AM
Post#2


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 7,013
Joined: 30-June 11



You only get duplicates like that when there already exists a linked table with that name already. I suspect that this is occurring because importing from A is actually import those tables from B and C, and then you go and import from B and C again, thus causing duplicates.

One way or another, I wouldn't push tables from one BE to another, just import them directly using UNC paths and be done with your problem altogether.

--------------------
Daniel Pineault (2010-2019 Microsoft MVP, UA VIP, EE Distinguished Expert 2018)
Professional Help: https://www.cardaconsultants.com
Free MS Access Code, Tips, Tricks and Samples: https://www.devhut.net

* Design should never say "Look at me". It should always say "Look at this". -- David Craib
* A user interface is like a joke, if you have to explain it, it's not that good! -- Martin LeBlanc


All code samples, demonstration databases, links,... are provided 'AS IS' and are to be used at your own risk! Take the necessary steps to check, validate ...(you are responsible for your choices and actions)
Go to the top of the page
 
dmhzx
post Oct 27 2019, 06:27 AM
Post#3



Posts: 7,115
Joined: 22-December 10
From: England


You do need to be clear on where Tables A. B and C actually sit.

Are they in three different Access databases, or the same one.

Normally you (or at least I) would link tables by going to their native database file.
So if A and B are tables in one accdb, (DB1) and C is a table in DB2, I would link
A and B via DB1, and C via DB2 even if C was also linked to DB1

Sometime when you link tables you need to refresh the view in order to see them.

If you go to the linked table manger, you can see the full path of your links, from where you may see that some are links to links.

Hope that makes sense.
Go to the top of the page
 
projecttoday
post Oct 27 2019, 07:00 AM
Post#4


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 11,300
Joined: 10-February 04
From: South Charleston, WV


When you say that B and C are linked to A, do you mean that there is a relationship between them (with foreign key fields) as opposed to an actual link such as the one that connects the forms db to the data db? I've never worked with Office 365 but in Access all you need to do is link your forms (frontend) db to all the various tables. Access will handle the "linkage" between the tables, that is to say, Access will find the foreign keys for you and join the tables as per your queries automatically. You can specify the relationships in the relationship function, but even that isn't necessary. You can see the link path of a table by placing the cursor on the table in the navigation pane.

--------------------
Robert Crouser
Go to the top of the page
 
eacollie
post Oct 27 2019, 09:56 AM
Post#5



Posts: 729
Joined: 15-January 05
From: Tennessee


Thank you all.
I'll remove the links from B and C to A and link the data files directly into the forms file.
Thanks!
Go to the top of the page
 
projecttoday
post Oct 27 2019, 10:30 AM
Post#6


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 11,300
Joined: 10-February 04
From: South Charleston, WV


thumbup.gif

--------------------
Robert Crouser
Go to the top of the page
 
tina t
post Oct 27 2019, 01:10 PM
Post#7



Posts: 6,184
Joined: 11-November 10
From: SoCal, USA


QUOTE
I'm hoping someone will be able to explain a concept to me about Access 365.

PMFJI, and hi-jacking the thread just a little, but: i thought that Office 365 was a subscription service, as opposed to buying the software one time. are there, instead, intrinsic differences between purchased A2016 and subscription A2016? if so, can anyone point to some references that summarize the differences, etc?

tia
tina

--------------------
"the wheel never stops turning"
Go to the top of the page
 
DanielPineault
post Oct 27 2019, 01:42 PM
Post#8


UtterAccess VIP
Posts: 7,013
Joined: 30-June 11



Tina, you pretty much summed it up.

Office365 is a subscription version of the exact same software. You continuously pay (monthly or annually) to have access to the software. The main benefit, and drawback because of never ending bugs!, being you get continual updates and features added. Don't pay, and it doesn't work.

Office 2016, 2019, ... is a one time perpetual license purchase of a snapshot of the software at a given point in time. So they freeze the version and distribute it. The drawback here is they are no longer issuing service packs with improvements. You only get security and bug updates, but no new feature updates (even if they are developed during the life cycle of that version). Buy it once and you can use it for as long as you'd like. Also worth noting A2019 perpetual license only works on Win10!

So essentially they are the same software at the core, mainly the updating is the differentiating factor.

--------------------
Daniel Pineault (2010-2019 Microsoft MVP, UA VIP, EE Distinguished Expert 2018)
Professional Help: https://www.cardaconsultants.com
Free MS Access Code, Tips, Tricks and Samples: https://www.devhut.net

* Design should never say "Look at me". It should always say "Look at this". -- David Craib
* A user interface is like a joke, if you have to explain it, it's not that good! -- Martin LeBlanc


All code samples, demonstration databases, links,... are provided 'AS IS' and are to be used at your own risk! Take the necessary steps to check, validate ...(you are responsible for your choices and actions)
Go to the top of the page
 
tina t
post Oct 27 2019, 06:25 PM
Post#9



Posts: 6,184
Joined: 11-November 10
From: SoCal, USA


okay, thank you, Daniel. i had wondered if i missed the boat somehow. :) tina

--------------------
"the wheel never stops turning"
Go to the top of the page
 
PatHartman
post Nov 3 2019, 04:06 PM
Post#10



Posts: 71
Joined: 20-February 03
From: Stratford,Ct USA


All the components of O365 have the option of running in the cloud so you can even run them from your phone. The exception is Access. Access must be installed on your PC as it always has in order to run. Also keep in mind that if your Access app needs to automate Outlook, Excel, or Word, those components MUST also be installed locally. Access cannot automate components that are running in a browser.
Go to the top of the page
 


Custom Search


RSSSearch   Top   Lo-Fi    14th December 2019 - 02:32 AM