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> Why Do People Buy Homes In Areas Known For Earthquakes?    
 
   
freespiritcheris...
post Oct 22 2019, 12:57 PM
Post#1



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...especially the luxury homes.., mansions. I mean why would you spend alot of money in an area where the 'land' moves suficiently to split!? I don't get it...
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jleach
post Oct 22 2019, 02:43 PM
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From: St Augustine, FL


I think it's probably not as big an issue as people who don't live in the area tend to think.

A little over a year ago I relocated from NYC to the East Coast of Florida (which I absolutely love, btw!), and one of the big factors was hurricanes. As a non-floridian in NY, I assumed that hurricanes are massively destructive, because we tend to see the very worst on the news. In reality, they seem to be pretty manageable, except maybe in very rare cases.

I expect the same for those in Cali and earthquake-prone areas. At least in FL with hurricanes, there's a lot of building code advances that really helps with the structural quality and safety, and while I don't have firsthand experience with earthquakes, I'm guessing it's much the same.

For me, the telling matter is: there's still cities there, and thriving ones at that, so whatever trouble it may cause can't be insurmountable.

Also I think it's probably one of those things where "if you grow up dealing with it, it's not a big deal" (like my upstate NY blizzards and driving around the mountains in a foot a snow and ice - no biggie, but don't tell someone who didn't grow up with it that!)


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LeeAnn
post Oct 22 2019, 02:50 PM
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Posts: 1,280
Joined: 2-February 00
From: Mississippi USA Central Time Zone


The same can be said about houses that are in areas known for Hurricanes, tornados and other areas. I live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast (don't own a house, I rent). My parents had a beautiful house right on the beach in a town called Pascagoula (I might post later some stories about this town, quite interesting) that survived a few hurricanes. Hurricane George I believe it was cause a bunch of water to get into that house and my parents finally sold the property to a neighbor who had always wanted the property but my parents never would sell. They ended up moving four times afterwards. Now if they would have stayed in that house and fixed it back it would have been totally ruined by Hurricane Katrina, that storm was a doozy (I should know, I was on the coast when that storm happened).... But instead the new owner tore down the house before that and really did nothing with the property. His house was ruined by Katrina btw as were many other houses on the gulf coast.

So no matter where you live I believe you are going to put up with something. Now yes, earthquakes seem to be more of a common occurrence then most other natural issues, but a Hurricane can cause much more damage in a wider area than most earthquakes... Now why would someone want to buy homes in an area known for Hurricanes???? lol.....

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Lee Ann Davidson
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kfield7
post Oct 22 2019, 03:50 PM
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Joined: 12-November 03
From: Iowa Lot


Why would someone buy a house in a area known for power outages due to blizzards and ice storms?
Why would someone buy a house in a area known for power outages due >110°F temperatures?
Why would someone buy a house in a area known for high crime rates?
Why would someone buy a house in a area known for massive land slides?
Why would someone buy a house in a area known for flooding?


Why would someone buy a house over an hour's drive from work?
This post has been edited by kfield7: Oct 22 2019, 03:53 PM
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dmhzx
post Oct 22 2019, 06:08 PM
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Joined: 22-December 10
From: England


People are all different, and all view their money differently.
The answer to your questions is simply because they want to.
I can't understand why anybody would want to use twitter or facebook.
Why they would go out for a meal, and take a picture of it to post on social media,

I don't understand why some people write code the way they do, or buy enormous cars that usually only have one or two people in them.

Why do people spend hundreds or even thousands of their money based on the label on the product?

Why do so many people spend money they don't have Buying things they don't need To impress people they don't know

Because we're all different and have our own priorities I guess.
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freespiritcheris...
post Oct 22 2019, 07:15 PM
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Posts: 155
Joined: 19-October 04



@jleach

Jack, I guess that's true, if you're native to those parts you would probably be used to it and not really notice it as much as someone who is 'not' native. But it must be totally scary though, even with a tremor, (I've seen Mr. Monk and the Earthquake!, a fave for many years) and the whole idea of a shake n shuffle with the ornaments falling of the mantlepiece and my tea spilling, and books falling of the shelf, not to mention the cleanup, if any. I live in a cottage with a big garden front and back with views of rolling hills, horses etc... and we obviously get some land movement, because every 10 years or so I might notice a hairline crack in the garden path and then a weed or two will take over and it disappears, nothing to see here, as it were, but you guys, everything's relatively speaking is on a big scale, including your 'hair line fractures'. I'd be kakking myself!

@LeeAnn

Omg, Hurrican Katrina, I'm not one for following the News and don't watch TV but I did watch in horror online on the BBC.. your parents were in that shocked.gif The devastation.. no words. Are all these hurricanes etc to do with Climate Change? If you get time, I wouldn't mind learning something interesting about Pascagoula:-)

@kfield7
@dmhzx

I know Why? is a universally known Question Mark.. one could go on forever!, but the idea is to limit it to the question if it has been understood, no need for extended parameters and pre-ambulations! yw.gif
This post has been edited by freespiritcherishes: Oct 22 2019, 07:20 PM
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dmhzx
post Oct 23 2019, 02:51 AM
Post#7



Posts: 7,112
Joined: 22-December 10
From: England


Back to your original question.
Maybe it's about showing off.

"Look at me I'm so rich that not only can I afford this fantastic mansion, but it doesn't matter to me if it gets wiped out in a hurricane"
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freespiritcheris...
post Oct 23 2019, 05:18 AM
Post#8



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there is that :-)
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LeeAnn
post Oct 23 2019, 09:43 AM
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Posts: 1,280
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From: Mississippi USA Central Time Zone


I was also in Pascagoula during Katrina. The devastation was wide spread. Many people lost their houses. I lost a Mustang and everything I had in my apartment (6 feet of water came into my apartment, my car got flooded). I escaped to Panama City before it hit. The wind there was about 20 to 30 miles an hour. When I went back a few days later I was just numb. I had to move into my parents house (which thankfully was off the ground some and little water came in).

My Uncle from Washington State came and assisted. My brother from Virginia came down as well and helped. One of the memories I have that I thought was pretty cool was getting MREs (military Meals Ready to Eat) that the red cross handed out and sitting on my parents back porch eating those. It was not a pleasant time but it had some good moments.

As for Pascagoula, this little town has had its moments. Back in 1973 we had some fisherman that were supposedly abducted by aliens (true story). The story was so big it hit national news. I drive by the site where the incident happens almost every day. we also have the Singin river where legend has it the Pascagoula Indians drowned themselves instead of going to war with the neighboring Biloxi tribe. As the walked into the river they chanted. It is told if you go to the river on some nights you can hear the chants. We also have a house that Longfellow the writer stayed at. And once Ray Stevens wrote a song called the Pascagoula Squirrel.

So there is a little bit of history of this sleepy little town. It is not much but I call it home.

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Lee Ann Davidson
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FrankRuperto
post Oct 27 2019, 04:51 PM
Post#10



Posts: 249
Joined: 21-September 14
From: Tampa Bay, Florida, USA


@LeeAnn

QUOTE
Now why would someone want to buy homes in an area known for Hurricanes???? lol.....


Because they love surfing the big swells? lol

Every location has its pros and cons, but common sense helps mitigate trouble. Since birth, I have lived on and off in hurricane-prone areas like Florida, where I currently live on the gulfcoast. A good thing about hurricanes, tsunamis and some tornados is that you have enough advance notice to prepare for them, or "Get Outta Dodge", whereas earthquakes, sinkholes, gators. snakes and several other threats can strike without warning. The main threat of a hurricane or any storm is not the wind, its the amount of rain and flooding that can occur in a short period of time. Although living on a beach is very nice, its the last place I would want to be if a hurricane or tsunami is headed my way, so I live about a mile inland from the beach and I also live on a second floor condo since I have a pretty lake next to me with gators in it. People and governments usually wait until something bad happens to take remedial actions instead of preventive. Building codes in Florida are now more strict. Examples, wind-resistant structures, imapct windows, any new construction in high flood zones, like the beach, have to be built on stilts. Since we have global warming and lots of ice is melting, we can expect the oceans to reclaim all of the coasts and some inlands of the world, but we have time to prepare for that. We live in a more dangerous world
This post has been edited by FrankRuperto: Oct 27 2019, 04:54 PM

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Currently supporting pawnbrokers that use my store management system developed with Access 2010 on Windows7. Experienced with Informix and Oracle DB's.
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projecttoday
post Oct 27 2019, 09:59 PM
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From: South Charleston, WV


QUOTE
with gators in it.

sad.gif

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Robert Crouser
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